​​TABLE OF AVERAGE AMOUNTS OF DRY ICE FOR PACKING FROZEN GOODS IN A SINGLE CONTAINER​

Weight of
​Frozen Food
Time  In Transit
4 Hours
12 Hours24 Hours
2 LB
2 LB
Dry Ice
4 LB
Dry Ice
8 LB
Dry Ice
5 LB
3 LB
Dry Ice
6 LB
Dry Ice
10 LB
Dry Ice
10 LB
4 LB
Dry Ice
8 LB
Dry Ice
14 LB
Dry Ice
20 LB
5 LB
Dry Ice
10 LB
Dry Ice
20 LB
Dry Ice
50 LB
10 LB
Dry Ice
20 LB
Dry Ice
35 LB
Dry Ice
For each additional day add 8  to 15 pounds


FREEZER NOT WORKING

​Do not touch Dry Ice directly. Use insulated gloves, potholder, towel, etc. Use the following guidelines for each type of freezer. For each 24-hour period:

  1. Freezer on bottom: use 15 to 25 pounds. 
  2. Freezer on top: use 20 to 30 pounds.
  3. Side by side Freezer: use 30 to 40 pounds. Place each slab, starting with the top shelf, on top of the food to be kept frozen. Bottom shelves will be kept frozen by the Dry Ice above it.
  4. Chest Freezer: use 40 to 50 pounds. When taking out the frozen food, carefully lift the dry ice slab up with gloves, potholder, towel, etc., without touching the dry ice directly.​

REFRIGERATOR NOT WORKING

For each 12 to 24 hour period, place a ten pound slab of Dry Ice on bottom shelf of the refrigerator to cool. Do not touch Dry Ice with bare hands. Do not place it directly on the glass shelf, but use newspaper or other insulated protection between the Dry Ice and the shelf. When the Dry Ice is sublimated replace it with a new slab. Keep extra Dry Ice in an ice chest. Because Dry Ice is frozen CO2, it will carbonate open containers. Carbonated water is OK but carbonated milk sure tastes different! Also anything too close to the Dry Ice may freeze. Watch out for items below the bottom shelf as they may freeze too. Regular block ice is better for the refrigerator - the old fashion "ice box" - but then the melted ice water must be removed.

DRY ICE

Please call for availability 

SHIPPING REFRIGERATED OR FROZEN ITEMS​

Freeman's Independent Ice

​Dry Ice sublimation (changing from a solid to a gas) will vary depending on the outside temperature, air pressure (on an airplane with lower air pressure it will sublimate a little faster) and efficiency of the insulation. The more Dry Ice you have stored in the container, the longer it will last. Dry Ice, at -109.3°F or -78.5°C, will freeze and keep frozen everything in the container until it is completely sublimated. These frozen items will still take some extra time to thaw because they will have been so cold.The table below adds extra Dry Ice for heavier items because some of the Dry Ice will be used up lowering the temperature of the product to be shipped to the temperature of Dry Ice: -109.3°F.​

​For Dry Ice plan on using 5 to 10 pounds for each 24-hour period depending upon the quality of the insulated shipping container. This will keep everything frozen in a container up to 15 quarts. For larger containers and greater shipping times multiply dry ice quantities by this rate. The best shipping container is a two-inch thick urethane insulated box tested to lose only 5 pounds for a 10-quart storage volume every 24-hours. Newer materials developed for Control Temp Packaging in Norcross, GA have tested nearly the same as urethane. Less thick or efficient insulation will need more Dry Ice because it will sublime faster.

   "SPECIAL EFFECTS"

DRY ICE FOG

Dry Ice when combined with hot tap water can produce vigorous bubbling water and voluminous flowing fog. For example, with 5 pounds of Dry Ice in 4 to 5 gallons of hot water, the greatest amount of fog will be produced the first 5 to 10 minutes. There will be far less fog for the next 5 to 10 minutes as the water cools down and the volume of Dry Ice diminishes. As the water cools, the fog becomes wispier. Dry Ice makes fog because of its cold temperature, -109.3°F or -78.5°C, immersed in hot water, creates a cloud of true water vapor fog. When the water gets colder than 50°F, the Dry Ice stops making fog, but continues to sublimate and bubble. The fog will last longer on a damp day than on a dry day.

HOW TO MAKE FOG

For each 15-minute period put 5 to 10 pounds of Dry Ice into 4 to 8 gallons of hot water. This will make lots of fog depending upon the temperature of the water and the size of the pieces of Dry Ice. Hotter water will make more fog. Very hot water will add its own rising steam to the vapor cloud. If there is no steam the fog will flow down hill and in the direction of any air movement. A small fan can help control the direction. Smaller pieces of Dry Ice with more surface area produce a greater volume of fog and cool the water down much faster. In both cases the result is more fog for a shorter amount of time. Keep the water hot with a hot plate, electric skillet, or some other heat source to produce fog for a longer time. Otherwise when the water gets too cold it must be replaced to continue the fog effects. If the container is completely filled with water the fog will flow over the sides the best. But the Dry Ice sublimation will vigorously bubble the water and splash it out. Even a ¾ filled container will splash some so place the container where spilled water will not ruin anything. The water vapor fog will also dampen the area it flows across. Be careful because after some time floors do get slippery


POWER OUTAGE, BROKEN REFRIGERATOR, BROKEN FREEZER

Dry Ice will keep things frozen when the power goes out or the freezer breaks down.

For gel packs, as a generality use one pound per cubic foot per day. (Most gel packs come in 1/2 pound size but newer ones are up to 2 pounds.) This will be last for up to three days. For a longer time Dry Ice has to be combined to extend the gel packs with the possibility of freezing the goods briefly in the beginning.

When packing items in the container put dry ice any gel packs and the product as close together as possible with the dry ice on top. Fill any empty space with wadded newspaper or Styrofoam peanuts as any "dead-air-space" will cause the Dry Ice to sublimate faster

POWER OUTAGE

If the electricity is out for a brief period of time keep the refrigerator and freezer closed and everything will be all right. The time everything will stay frozen or cool will depend on the type of freezer or refrigerator, the thermostat setting, and the temperature surrounding the appliance. Generally speaking on a hot summer day after the first hour, for every hour off, an equivalent day of storage will be lost for refrigerated items. Three to six hours could represent two to five days of storage. For the freezer, depending on how full it is, (the more full the better) things will stay frozen from three to six hours in a refrigerator freezer and up to twelve hours for a chest freezer.

ONLY TAKE ACTION IF THE POWER IS EXPECTED
​TO BE OFF FOR A LONGER PERIOD OF TIME!

Follow the directions for each appliance below:

From frozen lasagna to chocolates. From human tissue to prescription drugs - more and more goods are shipped refrigerated or frozen

First and most important a good insulated container is needed. An inexpensive styrofoam cooler from the grocery store will rarely work. It breaks easily and usually is not the right shape for shipping. A thick poly styrene box like Omaha Steaks uses. Next is the shipping temperature. Use Dry Ice for shipping FROZEN goods as Dry Ice will freeze everything in the shipping box. Use "gel packs" or "blue ice" for goods to be REFRIGERATED. A combination of dry ice and gel packs will extend the shipping time by several days if the shipped items can be frozen for a short time or thawed for a short time.

DISPOSAL

When finished with the Dry Ice, unwrap and leave it at room temperature in a well-ventilated area. It will sublimate from a solid to a gas. DO NOT leave Dry Ice unattended around children. If you would like a fantastic simulated volcano, run hot water and put the remainder Dry Ice in your garbage disposal. Use safety goggles and stand back. This will make a marvelous eruption.

WALK-IN FREEZER

A 12x12 walk in freezer will use 150 to 250 pounds per day. If the fans are running, place half the Dry Ice as high and close to the back of the evaporator unit where the air is sucked through. Place remainder slabs on top shelves directly on frozen food. Leave door open when entering the freezer. Carbon dioxide gas will accumulate in lowest areas and could cause suffocation. Use the buddy system with one person outside the walk-in at all times to help remove items from the walk-in. Leave walk-in if you start to pant and breath quickly or your fingernails or lips start to turn blue. This is the sign that you have breathed in too much CO2and not enough oxygen.